Wabi sabi


I finished the silver ring which I imprinted with a lace texture. I used a thicker piece of silver and it has a lovely weight to it. When you anneal silver and then drop it into the acid while it is still hot, a very fine layer of pure silver comes to the surface, giving a white matte layer. You can see that this remains in the grooves of the lace pattern.


Because I didn't want to take off any of the pattern, I was reluctant to file down the join. Normally you would file and sand to remove the line where the two ends of the silver meet. Susie pointed out that what I made is handmade and that I should accept it as such. And therefore not try to make it perfect. She used the term Wabi-sabi, a Japanese word that I had never heard of before.


Wabi-sabi is the term for a Japanese aesthetic which is sometimes described as one of beauty that is "imperfect, impermanent, and incomplete". I think it is a beautiful concept and an idea that I have struggled to explain in relation to my photography. That the imperfection is what makes the photograph beautiful. 



If an object or expression can bring about, within us, a sense of serene melancholy and a spiritual longing, then that object could be said to be wabi-sabi.

Wabi-sabi nurtures all that is authentic by acknowledging three simple realities: nothing lasts, nothing is finished, and nothing is perfect.